LEARN MORE ABOUT mary poppins JR.


Bert, a man of many trades, introduces the audience to the unhappy Banks family: father George, mother Winifred, and children Jane and Michael (Prologue). The family, the housekeeper Mrs. Brill, and the houseboy Robertson Ay, are shocked when Katie Nanna quits and storms out in frustration. George muses about what he expects from the household — the nanny, in particular ("Cherry Tree Lane – Part 1"). Though Jane and Michael insist upon their own requirements for their caregiver ("The Perfect Nanny"), George dismisses their requests ("Cherry Tree Lane – Part 2").

As if summoned, Mary Poppins appears, offering her services as a nanny. She fits the children's requirements exactly ("Practically Perfect / Practically Perfect – Playoff"). She then takes the children to the park, where they meet Bert, who describes how wonderful everyday life can be when spending time with Mary ("Jolly Holiday"). At first, the children are not convinced, but when Mary Poppins brings to life a park statue named Neleus, Jane and Michael are in awe of her. The children return home and gush to their father about the nanny, but George is preoccupied ("Winds Do Change").

A few weeks later, the household is preparing for Winifred's party, and Jane and Michael make a mess of the house. Despite Mary's magic ("A Spoonful of Sugar"), the party is ruined when no one attends ("Spoonful – Playoff"). Later, Mary takes the children on a visit to George's workplace, the bank ("Precision and Order – Part 1"). While Clerks are bustling about and clients are trying to convince George to grant them loans, the children burst into the bank ("Precision and Order – Part 2"). After a thought-provoking conversation with his children, George turns down Von Hussler's loan but agrees to give a loan to the kindly John Northbrook ("A Man Has Dreams").

As Mary and the children pass the cathedral, an old Bird Woman offers
to sell them seed to feed the birds. The children are at first disgusted by the woman, but Mary Poppins tells them to look beyond appearances ("Feed
the Birds"). Afterward, Mary whisks Jane and Michael off to Mrs. Corry's Talking Shop, where the children are given a delightful vocabulary lesson ("Supercalifragilisticexpialidocious"). Later, Mary Poppins and the children return home to find George in a foul mood. He reveals to Winifred that after turning down Von Hussler, the client went to a rival bank that is now due to see great profit from the deal. The bank has suspended George without pay. ("Twists and Turns"). Upset about their father's behavior, the children argue with Mary Poppins. Convinced they must learn their next lesson on their own, she puts them to bed and leaves behind a note before flying away over the rooftop ("Playing the Game / Chim Chim Cher-ee").

Six weeks pass, and the household struggles without Mary Poppins. However, Winifred encourages everyone to tidy up the house for the arrival of a surprise guest ("Cherry Tree Lane – Reprise"). The guest turns out to be George's former nanny, Miss Andrew, who immediately reveals herself to be a stern and cruel woman ("Brimstone and Treacle – Part 1"). Unhappy with their new nanny, the children run away and happen upon Bert in the park, who consoles them and produces a red kite, offering it to Michael. The kite ascends out of view, and when it's reeled in, it brings Mary Poppins back with it ("Let's Go Fly a Kite").

Mary accompanies the children home and demands that Miss Andrew leave. Miss Andrew resists, but after receiving a spoonful of her own medicine from Mary Poppins, the woman flees, apparently sick ("Brimstone and Treacle – Part 2"). The family is relieved to have Mary Poppins back ("Practically Perfect – Reprise"). However, the children are still burdened by their father's grim situation. They follow Mary Poppins to the roof, where Bert and his fellow Chimney Sweeps cheer them up with a lively tune ("Step in Time / Step in Time – Playoff"). Afterward, a Messenger brings news that the bank Chairman wants to speak to George that evening. Bert wishes George good luck ("A Spoonful of Sugar – Reprise"). After George leaves to speak to the Chairman, Mary Poppins instills confidence in the rest of the family ("Anything Can Happen – Part 1").

At his meeting with the Chairman, George is informed that Von Hussler's scheme has ruined the rival bank, while Northbrook has become very successful and is set to make George's bank a fortune. George is ecstatic ("Give Us the Word"). With newly found confidence, Winifred bursts in ready to stand up for George. Upon learning the news, she helps negotiate a much higher salary for her husband. The family is thrilled by their change of fortune ("Anything Can Happen – Part 2").

Back at the Banks home, Bert realizes that Mary Poppins will be leaving soon — the family no longer needs her help. He bids her farewell ("Goodbye Then, Mary"). Leaving behind only a locket, Mary Poppins disappears into the sky. However, she leaves the Banks family much happier than she found them, and they vow never to forget her ("Anything Can Happen – Finale").


ORIGINAL BROADWAY CAST

Ashley Brown - Mary Poppins

Gavin Lee - Bert

Daniel H. Jenkins - George Banks

Rebecca Luker- Winifred Banks

Jane Carr - Mrs. Brill

Ruth Gottschall - Miss Andrew

Brian Letendre - Neleus


LEARN MORE ABOUT THE AUTHORS

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original music and lyrics by richard and robert sherman

The Sherman Brothers’ career as leading composer/lyricists in family entertainment spans almost 50 years and includes two Academy Awards Best Score and Best Song for Mary Poppins.

The work of the brothers Richard M Sherman and Robert B Sherman is enjoying a fresh chapter of success in musical theatre with sensational stage revivals of Chitty Chitty Bang Bang and Mary Poppins now playing across the UK. The stage production of Mary Poppins, co-produced by Disney and Cameron Mackintosh, opened to critical acclaim in London in 2004, winning two Olivier Awards, with the Broadway production running for six years. 

The Sherman Brothers gained recognition in popular music with several top-ten hits - among them You're Sixteen, Let's Get Together and Tall Paul. 1960 marked the start of a phenomenal 10 year association with Walt Disney, during which time they composed over 150 songs for his films, TV shows, Disneyland and other theme parks. Their Disney credits include the films The Jungle BookThe Parent TrapBedknobs and BroomsticksThe Sword and the StoneThe AristocatsThe Happiest Millionaire, the Winnie the Pooh series, and of course Mary Poppins. They also wrote the most translated and performed song on earth, "It's a Small World (After All)".

They went on to compose song scores for Snoopy Come Home, Charlotte's Web, the Broadway hit musical Over Here! and the ‘fantasmagorical’ Chitty Chitty Bang Bang - with its Oscar nominated title song.

The Sherman Brothers created screenplays and song scores for Tom Sawyer (their music won First Prize at the Moscow Film Festival),Huckleberry Finn, the 1976 Royal Film Performance The Slipper and the Rose (with co-author Bryan Forbes), and The Magic of Lassiewhich also earned them their 9th Academy Award nomination for Best Song. More recent credits include the book Walt's Time - a wonderful autobiographical and pictorial journey through their song-writing years; the Disney hit animated feature The Tigger Movie, the stage musical Busker Alley starring Tommy Tune in the United States and Beverly Hills Cop 3.

In addition to their Oscars, other honours awarded to the Sherman Brothers include 3 Grammys, 24 Gold and Platinum Albums, as well as a star on The Hollywood Walk of Fame.

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book by julian fellowes

Educated at Ampleforth and Magdalene College, Cambridge, Julian Fellowes is a multi-award-winning actor, writer, director and producer. As creator, sole writer and executive producer of the hit television series Downton Abbey, Fellowes has won three Emmy awards and a Golden Globe.

Fellowes received the Academy Award for Best Original Screenplay for Gosford Park (2002). His work was also honoured by the Writer’s Guild of America, the New York Film Critics’ Circle and the National Society of Film Critics for Best Screenplay. Other writing credits for film include Piccadilly Jim(2004), Vanity Fair (2004), Young Victoria (2009), The Tourist (2010), Romeo & Juliet (2013), and the three-part drama Doctor Thorne for ITV. Fellowes also wrote and directed the award-winning films Separate Lies and From Time to Time. Fellowes wrote the books for the Tony-nominated stage production ofMary Poppins and for School of Rock: The Musical which opened on Broadway in December 2015, and was written and produced by Andrew Lloyd Webber.

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co-created by cameron mackintosh

For over 50 years Cameron Mackintosh has been producing more musicals than anyone else in history, including the three longest-running musicals of all time: Les MisérablesThe Phantom of the Opera and CATS. Joining this list of legendary titles, his co-production with Disney of Mary Poppins continues to break records and disperse her magic globally. Following its huge recent success in the West End, his new production of Miss Saigon is now playing a National Tour of the UK and will tour in North America later this year whilst the much loved Kinky Boots, co-produced by Cameron in the West End and in Australia, continues to kick up its heels.

Cameron also enjoys producing new versions of classics including Oliver!, My Fair Lady, the longest running production ever of Follies and recently reinventing Half a Sixpence in the West End to great acclaim. Other original musicals he has produced include Little Shop of HorrorsSide By Side By SondheimMartin Guerre, Betty Blue Eyes, and The Witches of Eastwick.

Cameron, with Working Title and Universal, produced the award-winning film version of Les Misérables. A film of the 25th Anniversary performance of the new stage production of Miss Saigon was screened in cinemas worldwide in 2016.

He owns eight West End theatres: Prince of Wales, Gielgud, Queen's, Wyndham's, Noël Coward, Novello and Prince Edward, all of which have been spectacularly refurbished, and the recently acquired Victoria Palace which, following a major rebuild and restoration, reopened at the end of last year with the award winning American musical, Hamilton.